e-ddress

Coined 4 years ago (confirmed with Michael Quinion, World Wide Words,) this is the proper spelling of address with the substitution of the e- to denote electronic address or e-mail address.

Here's my e-ddress. Drop me an e-mail tomorrow.


Dictionary of american slang with examples. .

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  • Abbot, Father —    This would be the correct way of addressing the head of an abbey. The original meaning of ‘abbot’ was ‘father’, so the expression is tautological. ‘Abbot’ is sometimes used on its own in direct address. In Henry the Eighth Shakespeare has… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • ace —    In American slang this word has many meanings. Applied to a person it implies great skill, great decency of character or close friendship. It is often a permanent nickname, but can be applied in an ad hoc way as a vocative. It is so used in… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • admiral —    The title of a naval officer of the highest rank. In Britain the Admiral of the Fleet compares with a Field marshal in the army; an admiral compares with a general; a viceadmiral with a lieutenant general; a rearadmiral with a major general.… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • Ahasuerus, King —    A transferred name which is used by Jane to Mr Rochester in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. Jane asks him to gratify her curiosity about something, now that they are to be Married. Rochester says: ‘I wish that instead of a mere inquiry into,… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • alderman —    An ancient title originally applied to one who was an alder, or elder, the chief of a clan. More recently the title in Britain of a senior member of a local council, elected by the other councillors. In the US an alderman is a member of the… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • all —    Used collectively to a group of people. ‘I’m afraid I really must be off’, says Jim Dixon in Lucky Jim, by Kingsley Amis, ‘Goodbye, all.’ A customer entering a pub in Britain is likely to greet those present with ‘Evening, all.’ All may also… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • alligator —    This vocative occurs almost exclusively as part of the phrase ‘See you later, alligator.’ That expression became popular in the 1930s, when an ‘alligator’ in American slang was a devotee of jive and swing music.    The New Dictionary of… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • all of you —    A collective vocative used to three or more people of either sex and of any age. ‘Do, all of you, come over for drinks tomorrow’ says a woman in Thursday Afternoons, by Monica Dickens. There are further examples of its use in Doctor in the… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • altos —    Addressed to a group of choirboys in Lord of the Flies, by William Golding. Male altos have singing voices in the highest range for men; female altos are in the lowest range for women. The term is typically one which would be used by a… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • ambassador —    An ambassador is formally addressed as ‘Your Excellency’, but the British ambassador in Don’t Tell Alfred, by Nancy Mitford, is ‘my dear Ambassador’ to one of his French colleagues. This expression manages to be both friendly and polite at the …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

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